Tales from Wagyu Mama: April to June 2014

The past three months have been all about new life, cute calves and quality breeding.

We’ve welcomed 200 calves from our Angus, Shorthorn, Highland and Wagyu breeds, collected semen from four bulls and had a very successful flush.

We’ve hosted visits from like-minded breeders from Austria, Germany, France and Norway who share our passion in creating the highest quality beef.

And we’ve had great interest from South America in particular for our Wagyu semen and requests for semen from our champion Beef Shorthorn bull Quoiggs Extra Special while Quoiggs Freud has generated his own little flurry of enquiries with his success on the show circuit (see below).

Quoiggs Freud, Quoiggs Extra Special

Freud and Extra Special at RHS

Recent press interest in the Wagyu breed has brought Highland Wagyu to the attention of UK chefs who are surprised and delighted it’s being bred ‘on their doorstep’ especially with the demand from customers to source quality meat closer to home.

We’ve also been contacted by a number of private customers looking at our Wagyu beef for a treat or a special occasion. In fact, we now have a waiting list!

April and May saw the majority of our new arrivals, including 50 calves in 10 days – that was a busy week! And it’s been so exciting to see the arrival of more of our F1s (50% Wagyu) and we also saw our first F2s (3/4 Wagyu).

Here are some images of the little ones:

F2 Wagyu cattle calf

F2 Wagyu calf

Aberdeen Angus 2hrs old

Aberdeen-Angus calf a couple of hours old

Beef Shorthorn calves

Shorthorn calves

Highland cattle

Highlanders

In an exciting first for us, we had three of our fullblood Wagyu boys at stud in May with their semen collected for our use and for sale in the EU. We’re also planning on collecting semen for international sale in the future so stay tuned.

Here are our stud muffins…

Carra

Carra

Dutch

Dutch

We also took semen from one of our Aberdeen Angus bulls, Idvies Proud Painter K460, and our Wagyu bull, Odyssey, for sale in the UK only. To round everything off at the end of May, we flushed for embryos in six of our Fullblood Wagyu girls and implanted 25 into Angus, Shorthorn and Highland surrogates and froze the excess haul.

Flushing for embryos in the crush

Flush in the crush

Embryo work Wagyu cattle

Embryo work

The month of May also saw Mohsin become Vice President for Stirling on the Royal Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland board and we were proud to be one of the main sponsors of the Royal Highland Show – the ‘Greatest Show on Earth’.

This year’s show season over the summer has been fantastic – as has the weather. It’s hard to believe we’re in Scotland with all this sun!

The HW Shorthorn team has been incredibly busy in May and June. Our star line-up of our champion shorthorn bull Quoiggs Extra Special, young bull Quoiggs Freud, Mohmar Georgina, Quoiggs Rhona E530 and her bull calf Mohmar Hercules, heifer Mohmar Gracious Broadhooks and yearling bull Mohmar Genghis Khan brought home the rosettes and trophies from Ayr Show, Fife Show, Stirling Show (for which we were also main sponsors), and the Royal Highland Show.

It’s not all about Wagyus and Shorthorns. In June we made a big announcement for the Aberdeen Angus breed with our exciting partnership with W & D McLaren of Netherton Angus, our neighbours and good friends.

In the last six weeks I’ve been going through the genetics, matchmaking the Wagyu girls with the bulls. I love genetics; I could talk about it all day. To get the Wagyus officially registered, DNA has to go to Ireland before heading to The Australian Wagyu Association. It’s a time-consuming process but absolutely fascinating. I just wish I could spend more time doing it.

As we say on the website, raising Wagyu is considered an art and in order to be successful, it’s 70% genetics and 30% diet. We also like to add in a huge dollop of passion and respect.

-Martine

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14th July 2014